Category: riga

Innovation Lab Riga

From August 15th till September 28th, 2014, Café Europa Riga organises event series at the container module which has been shipped to Riga 2014 – the European Capital of Culture all the way from the Belgium city Mons (more than 2000 km), which next year will be the Cultural Capital. Café Europa is a multi-functional, architecturally flexible, mobile space that can be adapted to the needs of the local context while maintaining connection to other cultural cities in Europe.
RIXC (Centre for New Media Culture) has turned the Café Europa container into the Riga Innovation Lab by organising a 6 weeks long extensive and manifold programme of exhibitions and workshops, focused on art and science and 3D printing. The RIXC Innovation Lab programme (together with artists and scientists from Latvia, Belgium and Baltic-Nordic countries particularly) will host workshops exploring themes such as urban ecosystems, fog and the future of water, 3D printing of sound (and other intangible and intuitive properties), food as energy in overpopulated future world, as well as visual perception and sensor/responsive technologies.

Lab No 1 : September 2-5 (Part 1)
URBAN ECOSYSTEMS AND CITY HONEYBEES
Exhibition and workshop by Annemie MAES (BE)

The 4-day workshop will continue to explore the complex world of honeybees, which artist and workshop leader Annemie Maes has extensively investigated for some years. The workshop will start with an introduction on the Urban OpenGreens project and the role of the honeybees within this ecosystem. Following, the participants will study the bees’ behaviour and architecture based upon insights from biology, art, design and materials science. The participants will explore specific structural patterns present in physical and biological environments, from macrostructures to biological microsystems. Starting from the collection of gathered organic materials, the participants will develop novel, bio-inspired designs for bee houses. Participants are expected to collaborate in the discussions, with drawings and by creating objects.

BIO: ANNEMIE MAES has studied a masters in fine arts, a masters of cultural studies and a specialisation in anthropological documentary film. By founding the organizations Looking Glass and OKNO she has played a major role in organising the multi-media art scene in Brussels, bringing together artists and art spaces from different European countries to engage in workshops and open research labs. The current line of her artistic work focuses on ecological issues, as in the ongoing Urban Corridors and Bee Laboratory projects: http://annemariemaes.net

FIELDS exhibition Riga

The changing role of art in society is one where it does not just create a new aesthetics but gets involved in patterns of social, scientific, and technological transformations. The exhibition Fields presents a lively landscape of art that challenges existing viewpoints, deconstructs social issues, and proposes positive visions for the future. Artists in the Fields exhibition make new combinations of existing fields-as-in-disciplines – fusing and navigating between the social and the natural, the scientific and the emotional, the sensible with the actual in imaginative ways.

Annemie Maes is contributing the to the FIELDS exhibition with the installation FORAGING FIELDS. She will give a talk on the art & science of Bee Monitoring during the RENEWABLE FUTURES conference.



Annemie Maes studies the co-evolution between urban honeybees and ecosystems. Bees are bio-indicators who are very sensitive to the different ecologies surrounding them. In order to research the optimal conditions for survival of the honey bees, Maes has set out several urban test fields – populated with beehives – in the Brussels’ Canal Zone. This area generates diverse activities, from community gardening and urban agriculture to accidental nature. All this develops between industrial buildings, office zones and living areas. Her beehives are augmented with webcams, microphones and sensors to monitor the behaviour of the colonies, whilst the surrounding ecosystem is scanned by analysis of the pollen and nectar that the bees bring back from their foraging flights. The different hives are all nodes in a distributed guerilla beehives network. The test sites are connected by the flight routes and foraging fields of the bees. Together they shape a green corridor through the city. The installation uses live-data to give insights into research, on the edge of art, science and ecology.

info:
exhibition from may 15 to august 4 2014, conference on may 18 & 19/2014
http://rixc.org/fields/en/exhibition/
http://rixc.org/fields/en/conference/